Why Would Anyone Be Led By You?

Just recently I was asked this question ‘Why would anyone be led you?’ It’s a pretty big question and one that I found difficult to answer. The natural reaction was a well-considered “I’m not sure”. There is certain degree of humility required to answer it properly. It definitely provides a significant pause point for reflection. I started by thinking about the most influential leaders that I have worked with and others that I know of or have read about. I considered the leadership traits that they displayed and tried to compare how I lead with how they have led me or lead their teams. It’s an interesting point of comparison.  What was it about their style that had people follow them and, in some cases, actively choose to enlist support for them? They certainly displayed a range of highly developed leadership attributes that they were able to draw upon depending on the setting/context they found themselves in. As I started to cross reference the skills and try to identify if I shared similar attributes, I came to a conclusion. People follow you because you are you. Whilst I may collect elements from each leader, ultimately it is how I choose to implement the various skills that make up my leadership. I can’t try to be like another leader, I need to be me.

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If you are always trying to be copy of somebody else then your talents and gifts never get an opportunity to shine. 

It’s not just a compelling vision or an ability to inspire that will see people willingly be led by you. Vision and inspiration help to get a journey started but they only last for so long. When the day to day work begins and the routine sets in it’s your leadership that helps keep the momentum. There is a wide range of leadership characteristics that form part of any successful leaders’ armoury. Courage, honesty, integrity, humility, instinct, empathy are all key qualities and not every leader has access to them all. The one quality that every leader does have access to though is themselves. Why would anyone be led by you? Because you are you. Being authentically you and not trying to be anyone else is a significant leadership lesson. I’m not suggesting we are all perfectly made, we all have flaws, but they make up you. The is no definitive list of leadership attributes because as the context shifts and relationships change successful leaders must adapt to the circumstances and call upon the skills needed at that time in that context. When circumstances change and they will, trying to lead based on someone else’s style can be difficult to navigate and leave you feeling like a fraud. If you are always trying to be copy of somebody else then your talents and gifts never get an opportunity to shine.

It continues to surprise me how many leaders try to be someone who they are not.  It takes a great deal of energy to be someone you are not and those that we lead get a sense that there is an incongruence between your words and actions. Being ourselves and showing that we have areas for development sends a very strong message, that we accept growth, that we can’t do it all alone and that we will always strive to improve because we can. Being authentic in your leadership by knowing who you are, what your strengths are and your areas for development will do far more to enlist support than striving to be someone you are not. Authentic leaders show a self-awareness that allows them to display their vulnerabilities without losing influence. These leaders have an sharp sense of timing. There are times for strength in leadership, when everyone is looking to you for guidance and there are times to share vulnerability. Authentic leaders are astute at taking the temperature of the environment and picking the right time to share. It’s not a case that they are trying to manipulate an environment but more an emotional intelligence that allows them to determine that this is what is needed at that point in time. Sharing one of your less glorious moments can certainly take the heat out of a room and lighten the mood whilst a well-crafted narrative about a success can rally support and inspire action.

Authentic leaders hold to their principles. Principles are different from values and beliefs. Your values and beliefs can change over time as you become exposed to a range of experiences. Your principles however are fundamentally you. These are the things that you will not compromise on. Authentic leaders stick firm to their principles, and this shows through in their leadership behaviour and decision making. I’m not suggesting that authentic leaders display a stubbornness that does not allow for compromise. It is more a case of their moral compass is strong in particular areas and this will always drive their decision making and leadership behaviours.  These leaders are often described as being genuine. They are honest and don’t have hidden agendas which leave people guessing about their intent. They may not be open books and are certainly gifted strategists knowing when to share and when to keep information close, but their purpose is always aligned to their principles and is perfectly understood by those they lead. There is a consistency about their leadership that provides a degree of certainty and dependability. You know in times of complexity these leaders will roll up the sleeves and get to work to ensure that those they lead have the confidence to get the job done. There is a great deal of trust that develops when our leaders provide certainty amidst the chaos. The calming influence of a leader who has both hands on the wheel as they navigate the obstacles can never be understated.

The one significant challenge that authentic leaders face is growth. Being authentic can mean sometimes the default position is to rely on the skills and talents that have been successful for you in the past.  The difficulty here is that what has gotten you to your current level may not be what is required to get you to the next. It’s been described as being caught in your stylistic comfort zone. Expectations change as responsibility increases which can leave you feeling like you are not being authentically you as you are challenged to move outside your comfort zone and potentially re-invent your leadership style. This is where a strong sense of self awareness is needed to identify what it is that you need to do next to continue to develop your leadership capacity. Successful leaders have the self-discipline that is needed to test themselves, to move outside their comfort zone and take on new challenges that will expose them to new learning. The attitude of ‘if you wait until you are ready, you’ll never be ready’ is a driving force here. At times being able to move toward a goal and keep moving forward despite setbacks displays more about your character and authenticity than the actual achievement.

The paradox of authenticity and leadership growth is a natural part of the leadership pathway. I guarantee that you are not the same leader now that you were 5 years ago. We must learn from other leaders. It would be foolish not to examine different styles, but it is your responsibility to take the various elements of leadership and make them your own. You can then choose to implement them in your way, in your context with your people. As you grow and adapt your style you are making it your own which brings authenticity. Herminia Ibarra, a Professor of Organizational Behaviour at London Business School, describes this as being playful with your leadership development. Just like a child would explore and experiment during play, leaders too can extend themselves by moving outside their comfort zones bringing new dimensions to their leadership. Trying on different styles and seeing if they fit your purpose and work for you is all part of the journey. In the end being authentic in your leadership is about being you. Yes, we need to develop, yes, we need to grow but when you look in the mirror you will know the truth. It’s not the title, the position or the power that makes a great leader, it’s the ability to add value to the lives of those you lead. Authentic leaders build trusting relationships, they understand it’s about the people they lead. How do you know if your leadership has left a positive impact? How might you identify this? Take some time to reflect on these questions and then maybe you can answer , why would anyone be led by you?

Culture is King

Culture and strategy are two of the most powerful tools that a leader has available to them. They shape the lived experience of every member of a school community. Culture is like your school’s personality, it can be welcoming, supportive and encouraging, it can also be the very opposite. The culture of your school is evident as soon as you enter the front office, it’s there when you walk through the playground, when you go into a classroom or sit in a staffroom. With a sharp focus on meeting a range of performance measures, this critical element of school performance can often be overlooked. It can be a strong  multiplier in overall school performance when all members of the school community contribute to a positive school culture.

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Every interaction you have as a leader will have an impact on culture

Unlike a strategy that can be copied and shared across schools contexts, culture is comprised of a wide variety of elements that all need to combine in just the right dosages. Culture is embedded and takes a great deal of effort to shift and get right. It’s a moving target that grows over time in response to how we interact with the varying elements that make it up. It sets the expectation and unifies a school under the one umbrella. A strong successful culture is based on a shared set of beliefs that is supported by structures and strategic decisions that help it flourish. Culture helps guide behaviours and decision making. You often hear “this is the way we do things around here”, that’s your culture outlining the expectations.

In understanding how culture is formed you must recognise that people come into an organisation with certain beliefs and assumptions formed through previous experiences. Recognising these beliefs and assumptions, whether they are true or false is crucial as they form the basis of values and can impact on your culture. Our job is to clearly articulate what it is we stand for. Carefully challenging underlying assumptions to assist in shaping values is critical in developing culture.  Our values turn into norms which if guided in a skillful way can develop a shared and acceptable way of behaving. This in turn will become our social norms. The power of social norms can never be understated as people generally conform to the norm. If treating people respectfully and approaching life and learning in a positive manner become our norm, imagine what we can achieve.

With this in mind we need to consider how we induct new people into our schools. How are we socialising them into the setting? What are they seeing as the norms? What are they observing that will shape their beliefs and assumptions? Obvious things like how do people interact with each other? How are conflicts resolved? How do leaders interact with other staff? How do we interact with students and community? These are all clearly observable interactions and send a very clear message on the way the school is developing an environment which is conducive to teaching and learning.

Whilst there is usually a dominant culture within a school there can be subcultures that can be quite powerful and if not monitored can work against your overarching direction. This is where the skilled leader needs to ensure that they consistently support all members of the school community in building a positive culture. It is not enough to have systems, routines and structures in play. The strategic leader takes the opportunity to respectfully challenge negative subcultures outlining why the environment they are working towards is achieving the vision of the school and draws upon positive examples that are assisting in creating it. In many cases where sub cultures have differing views on how things can be achieved, looking at our moral purpose can assist in finding common ground. It’s difficult to argue when decisions are based on positive outcomes for the students we serve.

One of the most important elements and perhaps the one that either reinforces or pulls apart a school culture is relationships. The basis of any solid relationship is trust. Where there is a strong sense of trust across the school and we know we can completely rely on the person next to us, then anything is possible. There is a proven connection between positive relationships and student achievement. A school culture that is focused on and celebrates positive strong relationships where people feel valued, respected and supported will generate whole school success across all domains.

As a leader I firmly believe we need to work on getting the culture right. The ideas below may assist you with your work.

Model a mindset – A positive mindset can go a long way to assisting in maintaining and developing a positive school culture. As a leader modelling a ‘can do’ attitude and demonstrating how hurdles are not barriers but opportunities for growth can set a very powerful example.

First impressions – From the time you walk into the front office there is a feeling associated with a school. Make yours a positive one. First impressions are lasting and set the tone for future interactions.

Challenge opposing forces – Establish sound protocols for challenging ideas respectfully. Negativity can be contagious and can gradually seep into a culture. It’s ok to not agree and for things not to always work out. What’s not ok is to constantly complain about them. Use the energy towards refining, reworking and improving. An environment of continuous improvement is much better to work and learn in than one of ‘I told you so’.

Communicate your message – Think of your message as your brand. It needs to be publicised and communicated. In the world of business advertising sells, why, because smart operators get people to believe in their brand. Build your brand with your school community with positive news stories.

Invest heavily in your staff – A strong focus on professional learning that is focused on classroom practice with a balance of support and accountability empowers staff with skills and knowledge but also sets clear expectations. Supporting this to be transferred into the classroom is pivotal in improving student outcomes. When people feel that there is a real investment in their growth, they are more willing to buy into the culture.

Students first – They have to be the top priority in any decision making across the school community. If we are to truly putting students first they will know. They will be able to see, feel and hear that we are placing them at the centre.

Culture over technical skill – It can be far easier to develop technical skills than adjust to a new culture. Our work is relational, technical skill alone will not develop the supportive trust and bonds that underpin a positive school culture. A culture of continuous improvement will allow technical skill to develop in the right environment. As Dylan Wiliam says “If we create a culture where every teacher believes they need to improve, not because they are not good enough but because they can be even better, there is no limit to what we can achieve.”

There are many elements that make up the culture of a school and every interaction you have as a leader will have an impact. As a leader you need to live your culture every day. It needs to be more than just a poster on a wall or a well worded address at a staff meeting or assembly. As the leader you need to live it, breathe it, model it, inconsistencies in this area create doubt and uncertainty. It’s one thing to say you want a great culture; it’s another task altogether to strategically build and maintain it.

All Things to All People

It’s long been said that it takes a village to raise a child. Whilst our schools can been seen as a small village within a larger community I’m a firm believer that the village is much more representative of the community as a whole.

In today’s society raising children is much more complicated that it has ever been, there are societal expectations, economic pressures, complex family arrangements and the monster that is social media. These influences have created a complicated, multifaceted environment in which to raise well-rounded children. As governments and communities grapple with this increased complexity often seeking quick win solutions, it is increasingly becoming the role of our educational systems to become all things to all people.

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It’s time for the village to assume the collective responsibility.

Traditionally it has been the responsibility of families and their support networks to set expectations, model values and establish limits that define and shape a young person’s moral compass. Children can became products of their environment where they learn how to behave, how to express opinions, how to interact with those around them respectfully and how to navigate the world safely and productively. I agree that schools certainly have a key role to play in character development. Public education offers our students exposure to the full breadth of our community where they are able to access wide ranging views, beliefs and opinions. This is a strength of our system. Over recent years though, there has been a dramatic shift where schools and teachers are being tasked with the responsibility of tackling an increasingly wide range of social issues.

Whilst education is the great equaliser and assists in rising above poverty, racism, sexism and promotes the establishment of strong moral and ethical codes it is not the miracle solution to solving all societal issues. It appears that with each emerging issue, policy makers with all best intentions and boundless enthusiasm, rely solely on schools to provide education campaigns that address and target the platform of the day. Strong, well-meaning interest groups are crowding the curriculum in the hope that schools can right the wrongs of others. It seems that the default position to almost any problem in society is to teach it in schools. There seems to be a giant leap in the logic. If we cover issues related to road safety, water safety, responsible pet ownership, sun safety, civics, obesity, cyber safety, financial literacy and the list goes on then we will be able to adequately solve some of society’s greatest problems. Whilst these issues are all important they enter an already overcrowded curriculum. Adding to the curriculum may not necessarily be the best way to address such a broad range of social issues. If we continue to use schools as the sole vehicle for addressing social problems then we will always continue to miss the mark.

Schools will always respond to the social, emotional and welfare needs of their students as the role normally performed by families becomes more and more part of the daily school routine. The skill set of the modern day teacher has far outgrown the traditional model as they become counsellors, peace makers, social workers, law enforcers, nurses and careers advisors. Teachers continue to work daily on developing well rounded citizens who will and can contribute to society. But this is not their sole responsibility. It takes a village.

Why is it then that this has become the default? Partly because it is seen as an easy fix. There is an economic argument that says that it is more fiscally responsible to educate than to build infrastructure and support systems to address the cause of the problem. Long term solutions require changes in behaviour. Changes in behaviour come from education. Whilst there is undoubtedly an economic cost for delivering new educational programs it is certainly seen as a more cost effective method. The second reason is that education is the great equaliser. If we deliver relevant curriculum that educates on a particular issue then we are building a foundation of change from the ground up. Sowing the seeds of change and monitoring growth is a well-used strategy. However as educators we know that working on things in isolation is not always the most effective change management solution. We need all elements of the community to wrap around the issues to see real change.

As we look towards our schools of the future we face the challenge of assessing what we want our teachers to teach. If we are to continue to be front line educators of social change then we need to consider how this is done and at what expense? As our education systems increase in size it can be complex to allow the flexibility to address social issues as a whole of system response. Our task is to enable schools to work contextually with local issues in the confines of a large organisation. How do we alleviate system pressure to allow schools to focus on the relevant task at hand?  Whilst we can be quick to add to the ever growing list we can at times be slow to reduce it. I have noticed recently a focus on ‘decluttering’. Whilst this at present appears to be more on an administrative basis there is hope that it could move to a broader platform.

The biggest question though is what role will the village play in developing our schools of the future? How will all arms of the community work in partnership to develop the skills needed by our students to address the pressures of modern society? Education systems cannot continue to be all things to all people. As educators we know that it takes a village. It’s time for the village to assume the collective responsibility.

Collaboration is No Accident

Have you ever heard the phrase two heads are better than one. In today’s complex and often challenging leadership space this has never been more true. The power of collaboration really has become the go to approach for today’s successful leaders. Building collaborative teams that problem solve together and share their collective wisdom is creating news ways of working and building a collective ownership that drives an organisation forward.

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This style of leadership uses the differences of the team to source solutions.

Effective leaders have always been open to suggestions and feedback on their plans, ideas and vision. Traditionally though this process has been limited and surface level at best. This method breeds suspicion and suspected self-interest around the decision making which are powerful tools that undermine leadership teams. What we are seeing more of now is an open and transparent model of leadership that allows the work behind a decision to be viewed and understood. This is creating environments where, whilst not everyone agrees, decisions are understood on the basis of the information provided. This greater transparency builds trust. When we give greater voice and inclusion to our decision making process we build a collective responsibility where the success is the responsibility of the team not the heroic figure leading the charge. It may not be possible or indeed practicable to have widespread collaboration on every decision this would in all probability grind our organisation to a halt but the big picture decisions that set directions must have high level collaboration.

Collaborative leaders understand the power of collective wisdom when problem solving. I’m not sure that I have ever been the most innovative educator, sure I have the odd idea that is outside the box but generally I’m sitting on the box looking over the edge wondering how these imaginative educators come up with these brilliant ideas. Successful leaders understand that they cannot be all things to all people so they build teams that have a balance of skills and knowledge. With a collective team effort we can expand ideas in so many ways, challenging our thinking to develop a single thought into a well-developed plan. This style of complimentary leadership uses the differences of the team to source solutions. Strong leaders develop norms and protocols that empower individuals within the group to identify when things are blocking a solution and take the group away from its intended purpose. These systems allow issues to be tabled respectfully and solutions identified collectively, building stronger commitment to the overall goal.

As a collaborative leader you have the perfect opportunity to build the skills of your team. Working in collaboration allows you to leverage the strength of the individuals in your team. As a high quality leader you have a responsibility to build the capacity of those you lead. Finding opportunities to coach your team to build individual skill or form complementary partnerships across the team allows others to learn from each other. This not only builds capacity but strengthens the depth of the decision making.  Working through to a solution provides the perfect opportunity to access coachable moments where you have work based problems to solve and quarantined time to guide team members through change.

Collaborative leadership whilst not new is becoming an increasingly adopted model. There is a definite shift from the heroic rockstar leader to the strong focused team where there is strength and wisdom in numbers. The old saying the smartest person in the room, is the room itself has never been more true. I have a few suggestions that I believe can assist in building a collaborative approach.

  • Know that you are not the font of all wisdom – No single person can have in depth coverage over every aspect. High quality leaders know they don’t know it all and surround themselves with experts. In large organisations there are experts within and external to the site, use this knowledge and skill to give you a broad perspective.
  • Share information – Effective decisions are made on balanced judgement, true collaboration cannot occur when one member of the team withholds information.
  • Ask for help – Effective leaders recognise when they need help. There is no shame is asking for assistance and utilising the wisdom of another.
  • Ask open ended questions – As leaders we need to carefully consider our questions. With the increased tempo of our work it can become easy and convenient to ask questions that we already know the answers to or questions that guide toward a predetermined destination. At times we believe that a quick response will allow us to get on with the job. The effective leader though will ask open ended questions that could provide solutions or paths not thought of.
  • Do what you say you’re going to do – When you are truly collaborative you rely on each other to get things done. If you say you’ll do something do it well and on time. The team is only as strong as its weakest link. Don’t be the weak link.
  • Be brave but respectful – Successful collaboration requires honesty. If something is not right then call it out and offer a solution. Developing protocols for how this is achieved encourages honesty by providing a safe platform to work from.
  • Listen – When we are truly passionate about an idea our ability to listen can be limited. As others try to add their perspective and we begin to advocate for our position, the ability to listen, compromise and act with humility show depth to your leadership.
  • Use silence – I’ve often used silence as a strategy. Sometimes having the thought and sitting on it allows you to gain perspective. Sometimes it’s what’s not said that builds the solution.

As we move into a new model of operation I urge you to collaborate widely. The days of silo decision making have long gone. The role of the leader has evolved into that of a connector, someone who can identify hotspots of talent and merge them together to achieve what was not considered possible. Successful collaboration won’t just happen, many have tried only to build a group that works against each other rather than the problem they are trying to solve. Building collective impact takes time, careful planning and strong systems that support the collaborative culture. As all successful team leaders have found, high quality collaboration is no accident.

Why is Failure a Dirty Word?

Why do we have a fear of failure? I guess it’s always been there. It’s natural to be a little apprehensive when trying something new for the first time, but if we let this feeling take over it could lead us down a path where nothing new is tried. Imagine the limitations we place on ourselves if we only attempt things we know we will succeed at.

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STRONG LEADERS ACCEPT FAILURE

Strong leaders accept failure. They use it as an opportunity to learn, they actively develop a culture where people are encouraged to push their limits, to step out of their comfort zones and take a chance. High quality leaders will look at setbacks, provide feedback and investigate how things can be improved. They provide encouragement and a supportive environment. They know that sometimes we learn best by seeing what doesn’t work. They understand that sometimes we don’t know what we don’t know. Some might say, if you haven’t failed you haven’t tried anything new. I believe it’s Ok to fail, as long as it is for the right reasons. Failure happens, it’s part of life, not learning from it and repeating the same process is the real mistake.

If we don’t allow people to try new things and fail occasionally we develop an unhealthy almost stifling culture, where fear of failure impedes progress. When we let our fear of failure stop us we are potentially missing out on some of our greatest learning opportunities. In some ways we may even get more out of our failures than we do from our successes. History is littered with people who have failed; Thomas Edison famously said “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” Imagine if Edison stopped after his first attempt. What if Edison didn’t have the resilience to carry on? Failure teaches resilience. I’m sure you have found that some people have this in short supply. Resilience can be taught however, but it requires you to pick yourself up, look at where things went wrong and devise a plan for the next time you encounter this situation. It also requires the right environment where mistakes are certainly not encouraged, but are accepted and used as teaching tools for further development.

Action research seems to be a big push at the moment. What is action research? It’s the process of testing a theory, collating some evidence and refining the practice to make improvements. In essence it’s the process of analysing actions so you can do better next time. It actively encourages you to look at your failures and learn from them. Action research often involves learning communities who work together to look at practices that are not as successful as hoped. This learning community is often embracing failure as a way of developing innovation and enhancing practice. A school that encourages action research is therefore developing a culture that supports its members taking calculated risks and expanding their learning. In doing so it is taking action to strengthen and further enhance its ability to respond to the specific needs of the community it serves.

I see learning from failure as one key difference between the successful and the unsuccessful. The successful keep going. They keep refining, refocusing and refusing to give up. They do not accept defeat and actively seek a new solution; they certainly don’t pass blame and point the finger. They take calculated risks, knowing why they try something new. They look at a potential hurdle, analyse current practice and actively work through a process to find a solution. Success is built on hard work, refinement and an unrelenting pursuit of achieving your goal.

In many ways we actually need failure. If we constantly succeed at everything we do we develop a false economy. Always coming out on top may cause us to never actually take time to analyse and find ways to enhance what we do.  It can lead to a, if it works don’t mess with it attitude. Sometimes failure is the motivation we need to make real change. It should promote strong reflection and encourage commitment to ensure that the same mistake is not made again.

The fear of failure can be a really difficult obstacle to overcome, but the reality is that at some point it will happen to all of us. It’s how you deal with it and the environment that you fail in that is key. You can learn a great deal about a school by how they respond to failure. What strategies do they put in place to support the next effort? How do they encourage continued innovation? How do they help to build resilience? Consider these questions the next time someone in your school tries something that is not as successful as it was intended to be. I am by no way condoning repeated and ongoing failure. I am however encouraging us to support each other, to take risks and to make informed decisions that enhance the opportunities of the students we serve.

I’m Getting a Coach

This year I’ve decided to get a coach. I’ve spent the summer listening to sport commentators discuss technical aspects of their sports, they’ve highlighted players blind spots, player weaknesses as well as areas of strength. They’ve had the ability to objectively observe and provide insight that if adhered to could improve player performance. As leaders we try to provide this to those around us. We watch, we discuss, we question, we guide all to assist in improving performance, but who coaches us?

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For real change to happen, for strong growth, find a coach to challenge you beyond what you think is possible.

As leaders we are committed to cycles of continuous improvement for those we lead, sourcing professional opportunities, constructing systems and routines that encourage and promote professional development. We extend this process to our own learning by actively seeking ways to sharpen our skills. Rarely though do we get solicited constructive feedback. For many leaders, feedback is only provided when things are not tracking as planned. So this year I’ll get a coach, someone who can provide one on one, objective, personalised feedback. Someone who can see different aspects of my leadership and shine a light on them. Someone who can ensure that I am very specific in my personal goals and hold me accountable. I know it might be challenging and at times may make me uncomfortable as I acknowledge that my practice may need to change. In the end though it’s about growth and continuous improvement.

As leaders we are usually very reflective. We take time to think through decisions, to review plans and strategy and adjust as necessary. Sometimes however, it can be difficult to reflect on our own performance as our underlying assumptions cloud our judgment. We observe, we assume and sometimes we look for the self-fulfilling prophecy to reaffirm. It’s not easy getting a gauge on how others see you and how this might be impacting on your ability to work with your team. This space is known as our professional blind spot and can leave you exposed if not identified.

When things are going well reflection can become even more difficult. At these times we firmly believe that our decisions are well thought out as our own data sources fall prey to confirmation bias. This is where your coach can provide an objective third party view with no stake in the decision. They will be able to dissect your data sources, operational approach and professional behaviour traits and challenge you on their validity. Quite simply your coach is the person who provides an objective view point based on unbiased evidence. Their ability to walk you through a process that provides clarity, grounds you and generates alternative viewpoints will be invaluable. This then places any required leadership change as your responsibility, allowing you to identify what it is you need to learn and what it is that you may need to change to achieve a more successful outcome.

In my early leadership days I thought of a coach as someone who observed using a tick and flick method to make sure I was not underperforming, that I was working at a satisfactory level. What I’ve grown to understand is that a coach is much more than evaluation and supervision. A quality coach can identify skill levels and work to provide a very individualised level of support. A coach has the ability to provide real-time feedback that can lead to behavioural changes being implemented immediately.

In a rapidly changing landscape with increased scrutiny on performance it has never been more crucial to have a sounding board who can provide you with constructive feedback. Athletes have long understood this, they realise that an effective coach can analyse their skills, knowledge and performance and provide feedback, that if adhered to can take their game to a level they would not have achieved through personal reflection alone. In times of challenge you can be the focus of heavy scrutiny and criticism, when there is an unpopular decision to be made you can bet that you’ll receive feedback. As we know this unfortunately comes with the leadership territory. What I am after though is feedback on my day-to-day performance to help me improve. Why? Because I can. My view is that an effective coach will equip me with the tools, knowledge, and opportunities I need to fully develop. Vince Lombardi, a former American football coach once asked the question how many self-help programs will it take until you improve? His answer, just one, it’s the one you commit to. In our day to day business we can get distracted and become absorbed in the tasks at hand losing sight of our own personal goals. A coach will assist in keeping you on track in your continuous improvement journey.

As we transition into a new year, some of us in new roles, we can be faced with new learning experiences and new role expectations. There can be increased demands which can stretch us, challenge us and leave us feeling vulnerable. It’s the perfect time for a coach. We invest heavily in the professional learning of our teams, building their knowledge base and technical expertise, ensuring that those we lead have the tools required to perform. As a leader you are in an influential position to make an impact at a broad level. For this if no other reason you need to ensure that you are at the top of your game. Your coach will keep you on track moving towards your goals.

This year I’d encourage you to think a little selfishly and find yourself a coach. Do your homework. It has to be the right fit, there must be a connection and sense of trust for it to work. It’s a genuine partnership. This person will hold you accountable and could push you to a level that you didn’t think was possible. Most leaders travel the safe and comfortable self-guided journey of continuous improvement. They seek opportunities that they believe will assist in their growth. For real change to happen, for strong growth, find a coach to challenge you beyond what you think is possible. It may be uncomfortable at times, but I guarantee it will be worth it.

Is Data Taking the Fun Out of Teaching?

I’d like to address the elephant in the classroom. The one that’s standing right in the middle taking up lots of space, crowding the learning environment. Data. Is it taking the fun out of teaching? I guess the answer is yes and ……… no. There is no question that systems, governments and schools needs big data to identify trends, predict patterns of behaviour, allocate resources to emerging and identified areas of need and provide high levels insights. Big data has its place but what about the small data? it can be structured and non-structured, it can be scheduled and randomised and is collected in usable sized chunks that are contextually relevant to a specific setting. Is it possible that using small data can be fun.

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If our data has no purpose then what is the point?

Many professionals are getting bogged down in the debate over what seems to be a relentless schedule of data collection.  What we tend to overlook in the debate, is the purpose. If our data collection is serving no real purpose other than to complete a spreadsheet and rob us of teaching time then I agree, what is the point? On the other hand if we are using it to sharpen our focus, to specifically target our teaching then it is critical. Useful data connects people with timely, meaningful insights into student areas for growth and achievement and when used purposefully can be an extremely powerful tool that actually puts the fun back into teaching.

Whilst I agree that data walls, visible targets and performance measures have assisted in creating a sharp focus on evidence based practices and demonstration of impact, is it possible that the pendulum has swung too far in our pursuit of individualised accountability? Nothing is more important to the success of our students than high quality teaching. I am in the privileged position to be able to view our teaching staff in action across schools in our system. What I have observed are staff who have high expectations, are able to cater for the wide range of needs of their students and use highly effective techniques that both engage and challenge our students. High quality teachers are always striving for student improvement. They are possibly their harshest critics, analysing their lessons, their delivery, levels of student engagement and the impact of their work on students. They are using small data all day, every day as a way of improving practice.

Small data allows us to provide our own insights into the relationships we have with our students, it allows us to develop achievable bite sized chunks that we can celebrate and this is where the joy comes back in. I spent my last years on class as a kindergarten teacher. By the end of the year my students could read, write, work mathematically in combination with a whole range of social, emotional and communication skills. I did that. I gave a gift that they would have for life. No matter how old they are or where they are in the world I started that learning journey. When we are able to see the improvement, see the skill development, know that we have had an impact, that’s the incredibly powerful and rewarding element of teaching. The question is how do we know and what role can data play?

Data talks, data walls, data walks, assessment schedules, moderating, criteria analysis, individualised, tiered, standardised the list goes on and all play their role. What is more powerful though, is a strong focus on teams of teachers using contextually relevant small data as a powerful vehicle to drive student improvement. Time spent imputing data into a spreadsheet could be better spent in teacher teams working together to observe practice and refine our craft. Our system actually supports this process through the Performance Develop Framework. At its core it underpins the notation that every teacher, in every school will improve, not because they have to but because they can. High performing teams use this system developed process to increase levels of performance, to strive towards personalised goals that impact on student outcomes. How do we know if we have improved? Small data. Colleagues observe and provide immediate contextualised feedback specific to the individual, its formative assessment for teacher colleagues.

Spending time in teacher teams using our collective knowledge of our students and curriculum to design learning draws on a range of small data for a very specific purpose. In NSW Public Education a strong focus on collaborative instruction is driving this approach across schools. We have strong evidence based, system supported teaching strategies that provide high level direction for our schools. Our teacher teams have the ability to contextualise best practice to become relevant practice for their context. It’s the small data that allows teacher teams to contextualise and target the specific needs of their students. Learning sequences designed with the selection of appropriate assessment techniques allow us to identify what it is that will move student learning forward. This is supported by the purposeful collection of a range of small data. Without the small data it’s just another unsubstantiated opinion that offers little direction.

It’s not the quantity of the data it’s the purpose and how we use it. The fun comes back into teaching when we view data as an avenue to investigate ways to unlock student potential. When we take time to reflect on where a student is, where we want them to be and how we are going to get them there in small achievable and measurable segments we target our teaching. Working this way we identify what students can already do and what they need to learn next. When we bring this down to a very specific skill level and provide a definite timeframe for evaluation and refinement it has the potential to bring a sense of accomplishment that can be almost addictive. It’s the small data that allows us to really know our students. Understanding the purpose behind our data collection and using it to target our teaching will help us build a better relationship with the elephant in the classroom.

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