The New Normal

One of the most difficult things in life is trying to restart once momentum is lost. Our current circumstances will end and pave the way for a new normal. In returning to the new normal we have an opportunity to be actively involved in carefully constructing what it could look like. There is always some catalyst for change that leads us to develop new habits and build a new mindset. We’ve had the most significant catalyst in living memory which required us to transform our education delivery overnight. For years the keen, the interested and the technologically savvy have sung the praises of using technology as an effective integrated tool in teaching and learning. Many of us have attended professional learning and come away with a quick energy boost or tinkered on the edges of a particular platform or software package to give something a go……. for a while. Far too often though we find ourselves back in the grind with little time to really engage and see how we can effectively implement technology into our daily practice.

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We have a once in a generation opportunity to develop a technological response that could enhance the powerful work we do.

Today, those we serve are immersed in technology in nearly all aspects of their lives. Under the current climate this has proven to be even more so. This digital revolution we have witnessed in education has provided a new way of delivering content and engaging with our students and staff. We now have the capacity to learn at any time, be it online, offline, in classrooms or in our homes. How can we harness this opportunity that has been created? It has often been said that out of adversity comes innovation. I believe we have a once in a generation opportunity to develop a technological response that could enhance the powerful work we do.

As we move back into a more traditional approach of learning it is time to think about how we might utilise the current momentum to strategically adopt our enhanced modes of education delivery. I’m not suggesting we let technology take over. There is no substitute for face to face teaching, I believe the last few weeks have highlighted the power of human interaction and connection in our work. The power of face to face teaching can never be understated. However we are perfectly placed to explore how technology can assist with personalised learning as a supportive tool rather than a bell and whistle to generate enthusiasm.  We have an opportunity to continue to provide the high-quality learning options we have been delivering as an additional support to our work. We must capitalise on this technological revolution and support the ongoing collaboration of our teams to consistently engage with useful technology platforms that complement face to face teaching and learning.

Think of the potential now to capture point in time information and readjust our learning to meet the exact needs of students by using technology consistently in assessment practices. We have a new problem of practice to solve – “How do we consistently use technology across systems to enhance our assessment practices”. At present the most consistent use of technology in assessment by big systems it to mark large banks of learning to determine what a student has retained over a period of time. We are now in a position to think about how we can use it in an ongoing manner, to locate a student’s current knowledge, understanding and skills to support planning for learning and teaching. I don’t see it as a way to replace the teacher but rather a highly agile and adaptive tool that can enhance and support the implementation of curriculum. Technology provides an easy and efficient way of giving feedback to students, and managing marking and assessment. Having information available all in the one place enables us to collaborate more easily with colleagues and share student progress at any time.

Almost overnight we created online learning spaces for our students and staff, spaces that we never imagined were possible. The level of innovation and growth in the confidence of utilising technology tools for teaching and learning from our teachers has been absolutely staggering. I’ve heard teachers talking about the quality of the work some students have been able to produce in this new learning environment free from possible distractions. There has also been an opportunity for some incredibly specific feedback delivered in the most innovative of ways. I witnessed teaching staff who have thrived in this environment with a new found freedom to create. We have unearthed a new generation of educational experts who have been waiting for the right moment to showcase their talents. How will each school capitalise of this expertise and utilise it going forward. We must empower these technological leaders so they can continue to innovate and create. I’m not implying that we were not creative previously, however you have to admit that the COVID-19 education revolution brought teacher creativity to a whole new level – on mass.

What are the implications now for our learning spaces? We’ve proven that we can learn without 4 walls, a desk and all of us in the one space. Do we continue to use a mix of online and face to face? Have we created an expectation from our students that we bring this level of creativity and flexibility to the physical space we now occupy?  As digital natives our students will possibly welcome these innovations and actively seek them as we return to the new normal. Studies have shown that after a significant event people exit with a boost of energy and increased enthusiasm. They ride the wave of inspiration and goodwill. Slowly though people return back to their normal routine. Our challenge is to strike now to keep what worked and integrate it into our practice before we revert back.

We know that there is some complexity when it comes to access of technology, not everyone has been afforded the same opportunity to engage online, however this too will pass in time. Technology is not going away and if anything access to technology will only increase not fade. Intelligent systems will be looking to see how they increase accessibility as a result of this pandemic. How can we reduce disadvantage to ensure equity of access? I believe we will start to re-evaluate how we distribute technological resources to ensure equity of access for all. This will be a significant challenge, but if we have proven anything through this pandemic we have proved that we are up to meeting challenges.

We know that for many this new online world has opened up new avenues for keeping parents much more engaged with how their children are progressing and provided new methods of communication. We have the potential for a wider reach into the community but must use this intelligently to establish clear protocols and boundaries to use it in its most effective form.

We’ve been able to come up with solutions that have been truly innovative and so creative in their delivery. If we are to keep the momentum going we must support rather than manage, we must be fearless, determined and optimistic to create this new normal and not revert back. We are perfectly positioned to develop system wide strategic plans for implementing and integrating technology. It’s critical we build on the momentum and invest in professional learning to incorporate technology that enhances the learning process and build on the current momentum. The new normal is exciting. It’s time to build on our successes and accelerate momentum toward our new normal to explore what might be possible.

Discomfort Zone

Uncertainty is a great catalyst for learning. When we are faced with uncertainty a signal is sent to the brain that something is not right, that something is different. There is often a feeling of discomfort and a range of emotions that accompany uncertainty. In our current climate uncertainty is possibly the only element that is certain. Our current global challenge has provided the most uncertain period in living memory and has left many people in an unfamiliar environment where they have been forced outside their comfort zones. Many of us have found ourselves operating in the discomfort zone. This is a place where, whilst uncomfortable, we are open to new learning and if we act on it, accept it and wrestle with the challenge we have a significant opportunity to expand what may be possible.

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Learning to be comfortable with discomfort may be the most important skill we take out of this pandemic.

The discomfort zone is a place that challenges how people view a system, a behaviour, a belief, an attitude or a plan. Being in the discomfort zone interrupts how we would normally deal with or behave towards a certain situation or in a particular circumstance. It poses enough challenge that it forces you stop and pause. In some cases it seems insurmountable which can lead to us finding a work around or in some instances ignoring it altogether and refusing to engage. Those that choose this path are closed to learning at this stage and will find it difficult to engage with the predicament. Currently, there is no ignoring the discomfort, it’s worldwide and how we choose to sit with discomfort may be a defining moment.

In many circumstances skilled leaders have used the discomfort zone as part of the development process for those they lead. Through targeted conversations they draw people to realisations, shifts in perception and possibly self-awareness of how values, attitudes and beliefs impact on behaviour. By having these conversations at the right time with the right person you may be able to help create a new awareness and see growth and change by developing an agreed course of action. For this to be most successful the person has to be open to change, feel safe and be ready for it.  However given our current climate change is here whether we are ready or not forcing us deep into the discomfort zone.

While it may not feel like it at the moment, this period of discomfort will go a long way in building your leadership skill set. No one likes to feel uncomfortable especially when others are looking to you for guidance and answers. For many of us when we get into an uncomfortable situation in professional settings we start to second guess our ability. We have doubts, we question our skill set, we make comparisons with others ability to cope in this setting. A flood of questions wash over us, are we intelligent enough? Do we have enough knowledge in this area? What is someone asks a question I can’t answer? What if I don’t have a solution? This leads us down the next path where we start to think of reasons why we shouldn’t take on the challenge. The fear of making a mistake in front of our peers or those we lead can be crippling. This negative self-talk, this skewed perception, this sometimes visceral emotional response is a result of being in the discomfort zone. As leaders we like a plan, some certainty, there is comfort in knowing we have control over the direction. It can be extremely challenging to lead in uncertain times, when you don’t have all the answers.  But we need perspective, this is not excruciating pain that is never ending. It is for the most part a moment in time, a series of events that are punctuated with briefs moments of discomfort.

Moving into the discomfort zone has become increasingly challenging in modern society. We have shifted from a landscape of challenge to one where we have so many supportive structures in place that we limit our interaction with discomfort. We have unintentionally eroded some of our natural resilience to discomfort. On a personal level we surround ourselves with like-minded people, our social media feeds are made up of those that we agree with, our posts are highlights carefully crafted to reflect a particular image, photos are cropped and retaken to ensure we are comfortable with what we are portraying. In some ways the ‘everyone is a winner’ and ‘everyone gets a ribbon’ mentality that has gripped our society has impacted on our ability to work in discomfort. These carefully constructed environments limit our potential to grow and explore what is possible.

There are many who try to resist discomfort. In doing so they deny themselves an important opportunity to see things with fresh eyes, to break away from underlying assumptions and perspectives that may be limiting their view or potential opportunities. The challenge is to persist and move past that feeling of wanting to return back to what was comfortable. It’s a valuable exercise to listen to your internal dialogue during times of discomfort. What thoughts are you having? Are you looking for ways out? Are you using language that escalates your feelings of discomfort? Do you have a physical reaction? Does your pulse race? Do you get a sinking feeling in your stomach? How do you manage this? Making yourself aware and drawing your attention to your reaction is the first step in overcoming it. Remember emotions are responses to stimuli and are no reason not to take on a challenge.

Once your mind settles into the discomfort of a challenge a change happens. As the work starts to unfold it actually becomes increasingly comfortable and possibly exciting as you lean into the challenge and explore what is possible. Learning to be comfortable with discomfort may be the most important skill we take out of this pandemic. Sure, no one likes feeling uncomfortable, but think of the incredible work you and your teams have been able to achieve whilst operating in the most uncertain of environments. Discomfort forces us to view our circumstances from a completely different perspective and stretches us to imagine what might be possible. If we learn no other lesson maybe we could inject some unpredictability into our leadership challenges to normalise the feeling of discomfort. By doing this we can ride the wave and understand that it will end.

What is it that you will take away from this period that will become the new normal for you? What will you let go of that you have done without? What will you continue to use, do or act on? How will you manage another period of uncertainty when it comes, because it will come, maybe not of this magnitude but you will face uncertain situations in the future. We are now deep into this challenge. It would be interesting to spend some time reflecting on how you have responded. Did you lean in or did you try to swerve?

It’s Time to Step Up

In times of uncertainty great leaders step forward. They know that in periods of complexity, in times of adversity they must step up and lead. This is when your true leadership skill set will be put to the test. Your reputation is what others think of you, your character is what you truly are, and now more than ever is a test of your character. Our current situation will test the depth and breadth of our leadership capabilities like never before and I believe we are ready.

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Our current situation will test the depth and breadth of our leadership capabilities like never before and I believe we are ready.

In times of uncertainly it can be easy to shift into management mode. Management usually occurs when we are able to work logically and methodically through a routine, process or system. Now is the time to lead, not just manage. We need to step into the complexity and provide guidance to those around us on how to deal with uncertainty.

Complexity is a term used across a wide range of areas. We don’t always think about the same thing when we talk about complexity. In the normal use of the term we might say I have to solve a complex problem, but what we actually mean is that it’s complicated. There is actually a way to solve a complicated problem using the current skill set and processes that we have or have access to. Complexity is a much more dynamic concept that involves reacting to situations as they unfold. Complex situations are dynamic, contextual and ever evolving. Leading in complex times is really another way of saying we are leading through uncertainty.

In times of complexity our leadership decisions can be more important and potentially have more consequence for those we lead than under normal conditions. Those we lead are looking to us for reassurance, guidance and support. Knowing your people and understanding how they will react to uncertainty, to new learning and how they can draw on system and network supports will be crucial. We cannot control the external influences on those we lead, but we can anticipate how our people may react and how we can best support. Using our knowledge of our people, our leadership intuition and our understanding of past behaviours will be key in this area. As a leader you know your context, you know your key players, you know how to leverage off their expertise and how to mobilise your teams. Building the capacity of those you lead to cope with new limitations and manage through new transitions will be a vital element of your leadership.

As an adaptive leader leading through uncertainty, it is imperative that you try to see the overall picture of the current state.  You need to be able to pull back from the immediate response and gain a high level perspective, we often talk about getting on the balcony. Now is the perfect time to get a balcony view and see how all work streams are travelling. This allows you to get a clearer understanding of the current operation so you can enhance successful processes and redirect those that may be missing the mark. It is easy to get caught up in the momentum and jump into decision making and hands on action. In times of complexity it is often a long game therefore we must build capacity that will assist in sustaining momentum. Once we establish our current state and have our big picture we shouldn’t be micro managing but rather relying on those we lead to do their jobs well. Work closely with those you trust, allow them to make decisions, support and guide them where necessary by building their capacity and confidence. In doing so you will assist in maintaining momentum for the long game.

Currently we have so many elements interacting continuously there is no way we can rely on a simple cause and effect relationship. It is important to continually map the present to identify what is happening now and see what we can do within current parameters. To do this we need to understand what each element is, we can’t make assumptions. We must draw on our flexibility and agile nature to pause, reflect and realign. It is critical that we monitor how our circumstances evolve and reassess. It’s difficult to define a future state under current circumstances but as an adaptive leader you are in the practice of mobilising people to tackle tough challenges and thrive. You will need to draw deep on your skill set in outlining a compelling vision, building enthusiasm and inspiring action to lead through.

As an adaptive leader you must ensure that the people you lead become part of the solution by changing behaviours and developing new skills. In unprecedented times there needs to be some shift in our thinking. Adaptive leadership therefore is about facilitating change that builds on the current foundations to unleash capacity. We have been presented with an opportunity. An opportunity to really innovate and create a game changer. What I have witnessed is a culture of collaboration where those we lead are united in a common goal. We are facing an exercise in creative thinking where we are focused on thinking about the previously unthinkable. The momentum that has been generated is creating a culture and set of core values that is binding us together. This brings with it a sense of confidence that we will work our way through the difficult period, whilst not understating the enormity of the task, we have the skills, the capability and the expertise in our teams to make a significant and positive impact.

As a leader in times of uncertainty it’s important to be visible, present and available. Those we lead need to see you working alongside them, actively listening to them and being available to assist them when needed. Making yourself available to connect with those you lead, being empathetic, understanding and accessible is critical in times of uncertainty. Your steady presence will be invaluable. Being always present can present itself with challenges especially in times of increasing pressure, with rapidly changing circumstances that require quick and decisive decisions. In these situations leaders must maintain transparency, be very clear that they are acting on current information and that this may be subject to change. You must discipline yourself to think only in terms of solutions. Encouraging your team to be solutions focused can create and sustain a sense of community that is more important than ever.

As leaders it is critical that you are the calming influence despite how you may be feeling internally. To do this there are some key techniques that I have found useful:

Think today – It’s about one day at a time, what is in front of me at this moment in this time. Whilst we must maintain a long term strategy, sometimes the enormity of the task requires us to focus on one issue at a time. Work through them, be methodical, you’ve done it before.

Acceptance – We need to accept that complexity is difficult. As a leader you need to make peace with uncertainty and understand that nothing remains static, we are constantly evolving. Bringing this understanding to those you lead can be a significant mindset shift. This will allow you to deal with the unexpected although you may not know what it is, you know that it could present itself at any time.

Reflection – Building in time to reflect on decisions as more information comes to hand and regularly debriefing with those we lead is critical in building trust. Taking time to reflect personally on how you are travelling is also vitally important. No leader can do it alone, reach out to your support network.

Work Together– Suspend judgement, listen to ideas, be open to new ways of working and thinking. It’s OK to disagree but now more than ever we need to come together with a united voice. Will we always get it right, possibly not, but publicly criticising and casting blame serves no purpose. Working together on a solution is the only way forward.

There is no doubt that this is a time that we will look back on and learn from. As leaders we must understand that those we are leading are observing us and will often look to emulate our behaviour. We must ensure that we deliver a leadership model that they’ll actively choose to follow. We must lead by example. Set the standard that you want to see in your team. Look after them, nurture them and lead through this like never before.

Version Control

There are times when we feel like our emotions are beyond our control. When we are under pressure, when we are engaged in an uncomfortable situation or conversation and internally we can feel our emotions rising. You can physically feel the change, it might be butterflies in the stomach, it could also be the red mist rising. There are other times when our emotions come on without warning, but it is how we manage this that is the mark of real leadership. Sometimes these emotions pass very quickly, at other times they can last longer, that feeling of frustration at a situation that should resolve so easily lingering on and triggering your emotions at the very thought of it. In reality, you have the ability to learn how to change your mood and regulate your emotional state which ultimately will enable you to choose which version of you shows up in any situation. 

Leaders who are able to manage their own emotions and master ‘version control’ as they interact with others are better equipped to deal with the pressure of leadership.

Whilst it is undeniable that there are many aspects to leadership, the most important element involves your interactions with people. The best leaders are able to build positive sustainable relationships that develop a culture of trust, respect and collaboration. They are able to fuel a positive climate in which those they serve feel supported, encouraged and emotionally safe. With work demands increasing, higher levels of accountability and a rapidly changing landscape, leaders who are able to manage their own emotions and master ‘version control’ as they interact with others are better equipped to deal with the pressure of leadership.

Most leaders are astute at paying attention to the emotional reactions of others. We watch their body language, we listen to their tone, we look for facial expressions and try to identify cues that give us insight as to how they are feeling about the situation they are in. What we often overlook though is the signals that we are giving and the way our emotional reactions are feeding into the interaction. There are occasions where there is an unintended negative spill from our previous environment that feeds into our present environment. In version control however you are able to strategically be prepared as you transition from one environment to the next.

One of the greatest challenges we all encounter in leadership positions is managing our own internal emotional state, especially in difficult situations. Our reactions, behaviours and decisions during this time set the platform for those we lead and create the climate we are trying to promote. Being able to manage your emotional state and determine what version of you is present at any given time even in the most challenging of situations is clearly something that is an incredibly powerful leadership skill. Like all skills though you need to practice, you need to understand how to use it and you need to recognise when you need to work harder at developing it. 

It has often been said that you can’t control the way people feel, but you can control how you react to them. There are times in our day when we are interacting with people and it can be difficult to know which version you are interacting with. The colleague who walks past you without acknowledgement may be in the version of father with a sick child at home or the version of finance broker with a late mortgage payment who at that point in time does not feel like engaging with anyone. The colleague who snaps back at a seemingly reasonable request may have had an argument with their spouse, a sick pet and a relative in hospital. As a leader we need to be aware that not everyone has version control and whilst we don’t tolerate unacceptable behaviour we take time to understand it without passing judgment. In these circumstances, having a firm grasp on your version of you is crucial.  

What we need to understand is that at certain points we can have a huge impact on those we lead and we need to ensure that we don’t miss the opportunity because we have not presented with the right version of ourselves. I’ve been interested in the work of Dr Adam Fraser who talks about the third space, the space when we transition from one environment to another. This is the time we have to check what version of ourselves will be entering the next interaction and how we can manage our emotional state to ensure it is the right version at the right time. The way we think about a situation can have an extremely powerful effect on your emotions which in turn guides your behaviours and decision making. As you would know it can be much harder to shift from below the line states of mind to above the line states of mind so being able to recognise and act is vitally important for those in leadership positions. 

So how do you do it, how do you ensure version control is in place. 

Breathe

I think it is important to take a small amount of time just to centre yourself before you transition from one point to another. This does not have to be an exhaustive exercise, it could be as little as taking a few deep breaths as you leave one encounter to another. Doing this allows you to pause momentarily and check your state before you give yourself a chance to act or react.  

Change the Image

Sometimes we have a negative image of how an interaction may play out which will impact on our thoughts and feelings that we carry into the interaction. We need to try to look from different perspectives to shift the image we are visualising. 

Move

Moving from one space to another provides you an opportunity  to let go of your current state and provides a physical reminder to shift into the version you need. If you are not leaving the environment just standing up as a transition can be enough. Using this as a signal that you are transitioning and need to centre again can be all that is needed. 

Reframe Self Talk

Change the internal dialogue and shift the language you use. In our transitions between one interaction to another we often have an internal conversation about what just happened or what might happen. The language we use will determine how we show up in the next interaction. Focussing on the positive rather than looking for what did not go well can have an enormous impact. It’s not always sunshine and rainbows but beating yourself up will not give you a different outcome to what has already occurred and will certainly limit your ability to show up in the right version.  

Monitor

Try paying attention to your feelings in different settings and when you’re with different individuals and groups. Monitoring your emotional state with different groups in different contexts allows you to develop crucial background information about what version you need to bring for the context you are entering.

Recognising

Recognising how you are feeling and understanding your own behavioural styles are key to regulating your emotional state. If you are a conflict avoider recognising how conflict makes you feel prior to entering and managing it allows you to be more effective. If you become frustrated easily recognising your physical and emotional signals of frustration will allow you to regroup or implement a strategy that supports you to manage your frustration. 

Focussing on version control and identifying how your thinking patterns can influence your interactions with others will allow you to foster the power of relationships. The ability to select the right version is a skill that will give you enormous emotional freedom and has the potential to have a significant impact on your leadership and the culture you establish. It does not mean that you will not have negative emotions or times when you question the purpose but it means that you are aware and can choose how you respond. I am also not suggesting that we have to regulate every emotion, there are many times when the emotional state you present in are appropriate for the context. Version control is not about suppressing your emotions, it’s about recognising them and understanding that you have control over them not they over you. 

Managing your emotional state can be difficult at times but it is a skill that is well worth developing. Having the ability to reset and be focussed in every interaction allows you to be present and connect with those you are interacting with. Remember your version can be contagious, how you show up can have a significant impact on others. Being able to control the version of yourself in your interactions places you in a position of strength to build relationships and create the emotional safety that creates the positive trusting climate that allows others to thrive.

Why Would Anyone Be Led By You?

Just recently I was asked this question ‘Why would anyone be led you?’ It’s a pretty big question and one that I found difficult to answer. The natural reaction was a well-considered “I’m not sure”. There is certain degree of humility required to answer it properly. It definitely provides a significant pause point for reflection. I started by thinking about the most influential leaders that I have worked with and others that I know of or have read about. I considered the leadership traits that they displayed and tried to compare how I lead with how they have led me or lead their teams. It’s an interesting point of comparison.  What was it about their style that had people follow them and, in some cases, actively choose to enlist support for them? They certainly displayed a range of highly developed leadership attributes that they were able to draw upon depending on the setting/context they found themselves in. As I started to cross reference the skills and try to identify if I shared similar attributes, I came to a conclusion. People follow you because you are you. Whilst I may collect elements from each leader, ultimately it is how I choose to implement the various skills that make up my leadership. I can’t try to be like another leader, I need to be me.

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If you are always trying to be copy of somebody else then your talents and gifts never get an opportunity to shine. 

It’s not just a compelling vision or an ability to inspire that will see people willingly be led by you. Vision and inspiration help to get a journey started but they only last for so long. When the day to day work begins and the routine sets in it’s your leadership that helps keep the momentum. There is a wide range of leadership characteristics that form part of any successful leaders’ armoury. Courage, honesty, integrity, humility, instinct, empathy are all key qualities and not every leader has access to them all. The one quality that every leader does have access to though is themselves. Why would anyone be led by you? Because you are you. Being authentically you and not trying to be anyone else is a significant leadership lesson. I’m not suggesting we are all perfectly made, we all have flaws, but they make up you. The is no definitive list of leadership attributes because as the context shifts and relationships change successful leaders must adapt to the circumstances and call upon the skills needed at that time in that context. When circumstances change and they will, trying to lead based on someone else’s style can be difficult to navigate and leave you feeling like a fraud. If you are always trying to be copy of somebody else then your talents and gifts never get an opportunity to shine.

It continues to surprise me how many leaders try to be someone who they are not.  It takes a great deal of energy to be someone you are not and those that we lead get a sense that there is an incongruence between your words and actions. Being ourselves and showing that we have areas for development sends a very strong message, that we accept growth, that we can’t do it all alone and that we will always strive to improve because we can. Being authentic in your leadership by knowing who you are, what your strengths are and your areas for development will do far more to enlist support than striving to be someone you are not. Authentic leaders show a self-awareness that allows them to display their vulnerabilities without losing influence. These leaders have an sharp sense of timing. There are times for strength in leadership, when everyone is looking to you for guidance and there are times to share vulnerability. Authentic leaders are astute at taking the temperature of the environment and picking the right time to share. It’s not a case that they are trying to manipulate an environment but more an emotional intelligence that allows them to determine that this is what is needed at that point in time. Sharing one of your less glorious moments can certainly take the heat out of a room and lighten the mood whilst a well-crafted narrative about a success can rally support and inspire action.

Authentic leaders hold to their principles. Principles are different from values and beliefs. Your values and beliefs can change over time as you become exposed to a range of experiences. Your principles however are fundamentally you. These are the things that you will not compromise on. Authentic leaders stick firm to their principles, and this shows through in their leadership behaviour and decision making. I’m not suggesting that authentic leaders display a stubbornness that does not allow for compromise. It is more a case of their moral compass is strong in particular areas and this will always drive their decision making and leadership behaviours.  These leaders are often described as being genuine. They are honest and don’t have hidden agendas which leave people guessing about their intent. They may not be open books and are certainly gifted strategists knowing when to share and when to keep information close, but their purpose is always aligned to their principles and is perfectly understood by those they lead. There is a consistency about their leadership that provides a degree of certainty and dependability. You know in times of complexity these leaders will roll up the sleeves and get to work to ensure that those they lead have the confidence to get the job done. There is a great deal of trust that develops when our leaders provide certainty amidst the chaos. The calming influence of a leader who has both hands on the wheel as they navigate the obstacles can never be understated.

The one significant challenge that authentic leaders face is growth. Being authentic can mean sometimes the default position is to rely on the skills and talents that have been successful for you in the past.  The difficulty here is that what has gotten you to your current level may not be what is required to get you to the next. It’s been described as being caught in your stylistic comfort zone. Expectations change as responsibility increases which can leave you feeling like you are not being authentically you as you are challenged to move outside your comfort zone and potentially re-invent your leadership style. This is where a strong sense of self awareness is needed to identify what it is that you need to do next to continue to develop your leadership capacity. Successful leaders have the self-discipline that is needed to test themselves, to move outside their comfort zone and take on new challenges that will expose them to new learning. The attitude of ‘if you wait until you are ready, you’ll never be ready’ is a driving force here. At times being able to move toward a goal and keep moving forward despite setbacks displays more about your character and authenticity than the actual achievement.

The paradox of authenticity and leadership growth is a natural part of the leadership pathway. I guarantee that you are not the same leader now that you were 5 years ago. We must learn from other leaders. It would be foolish not to examine different styles, but it is your responsibility to take the various elements of leadership and make them your own. You can then choose to implement them in your way, in your context with your people. As you grow and adapt your style you are making it your own which brings authenticity. Herminia Ibarra, a Professor of Organizational Behaviour at London Business School, describes this as being playful with your leadership development. Just like a child would explore and experiment during play, leaders too can extend themselves by moving outside their comfort zones bringing new dimensions to their leadership. Trying on different styles and seeing if they fit your purpose and work for you is all part of the journey. In the end being authentic in your leadership is about being you. Yes, we need to develop, yes, we need to grow but when you look in the mirror you will know the truth. It’s not the title, the position or the power that makes a great leader, it’s the ability to add value to the lives of those you lead. Authentic leaders build trusting relationships, they understand it’s about the people they lead. How do you know if your leadership has left a positive impact? How might you identify this? Take some time to reflect on these questions and then maybe you can answer , why would anyone be led by you?

Culture is King

Culture and strategy are two of the most powerful tools that a leader has available to them. They shape the lived experience of every member of a school community. Culture is like your school’s personality, it can be welcoming, supportive and encouraging, it can also be the very opposite. The culture of your school is evident as soon as you enter the front office, it’s there when you walk through the playground, when you go into a classroom or sit in a staffroom. With a sharp focus on meeting a range of performance measures, this critical element of school performance can often be overlooked. It can be a strong  multiplier in overall school performance when all members of the school community contribute to a positive school culture.

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Every interaction you have as a leader will have an impact on culture

Unlike a strategy that can be copied and shared across schools contexts, culture is comprised of a wide variety of elements that all need to combine in just the right dosages. Culture is embedded and takes a great deal of effort to shift and get right. It’s a moving target that grows over time in response to how we interact with the varying elements that make it up. It sets the expectation and unifies a school under the one umbrella. A strong successful culture is based on a shared set of beliefs that is supported by structures and strategic decisions that help it flourish. Culture helps guide behaviours and decision making. You often hear “this is the way we do things around here”, that’s your culture outlining the expectations.

In understanding how culture is formed you must recognise that people come into an organisation with certain beliefs and assumptions formed through previous experiences. Recognising these beliefs and assumptions, whether they are true or false is crucial as they form the basis of values and can impact on your culture. Our job is to clearly articulate what it is we stand for. Carefully challenging underlying assumptions to assist in shaping values is critical in developing culture.  Our values turn into norms which if guided in a skillful way can develop a shared and acceptable way of behaving. This in turn will become our social norms. The power of social norms can never be understated as people generally conform to the norm. If treating people respectfully and approaching life and learning in a positive manner become our norm, imagine what we can achieve.

With this in mind we need to consider how we induct new people into our schools. How are we socialising them into the setting? What are they seeing as the norms? What are they observing that will shape their beliefs and assumptions? Obvious things like how do people interact with each other? How are conflicts resolved? How do leaders interact with other staff? How do we interact with students and community? These are all clearly observable interactions and send a very clear message on the way the school is developing an environment which is conducive to teaching and learning.

Whilst there is usually a dominant culture within a school there can be subcultures that can be quite powerful and if not monitored can work against your overarching direction. This is where the skilled leader needs to ensure that they consistently support all members of the school community in building a positive culture. It is not enough to have systems, routines and structures in play. The strategic leader takes the opportunity to respectfully challenge negative subcultures outlining why the environment they are working towards is achieving the vision of the school and draws upon positive examples that are assisting in creating it. In many cases where sub cultures have differing views on how things can be achieved, looking at our moral purpose can assist in finding common ground. It’s difficult to argue when decisions are based on positive outcomes for the students we serve.

One of the most important elements and perhaps the one that either reinforces or pulls apart a school culture is relationships. The basis of any solid relationship is trust. Where there is a strong sense of trust across the school and we know we can completely rely on the person next to us, then anything is possible. There is a proven connection between positive relationships and student achievement. A school culture that is focused on and celebrates positive strong relationships where people feel valued, respected and supported will generate whole school success across all domains.

As a leader I firmly believe we need to work on getting the culture right. The ideas below may assist you with your work.

Model a mindset – A positive mindset can go a long way to assisting in maintaining and developing a positive school culture. As a leader modelling a ‘can do’ attitude and demonstrating how hurdles are not barriers but opportunities for growth can set a very powerful example.

First impressions – From the time you walk into the front office there is a feeling associated with a school. Make yours a positive one. First impressions are lasting and set the tone for future interactions.

Challenge opposing forces – Establish sound protocols for challenging ideas respectfully. Negativity can be contagious and can gradually seep into a culture. It’s ok to not agree and for things not to always work out. What’s not ok is to constantly complain about them. Use the energy towards refining, reworking and improving. An environment of continuous improvement is much better to work and learn in than one of ‘I told you so’.

Communicate your message – Think of your message as your brand. It needs to be publicised and communicated. In the world of business advertising sells, why, because smart operators get people to believe in their brand. Build your brand with your school community with positive news stories.

Invest heavily in your staff – A strong focus on professional learning that is focused on classroom practice with a balance of support and accountability empowers staff with skills and knowledge but also sets clear expectations. Supporting this to be transferred into the classroom is pivotal in improving student outcomes. When people feel that there is a real investment in their growth, they are more willing to buy into the culture.

Students first – They have to be the top priority in any decision making across the school community. If we are to truly putting students first they will know. They will be able to see, feel and hear that we are placing them at the centre.

Culture over technical skill – It can be far easier to develop technical skills than adjust to a new culture. Our work is relational, technical skill alone will not develop the supportive trust and bonds that underpin a positive school culture. A culture of continuous improvement will allow technical skill to develop in the right environment. As Dylan Wiliam says “If we create a culture where every teacher believes they need to improve, not because they are not good enough but because they can be even better, there is no limit to what we can achieve.”

There are many elements that make up the culture of a school and every interaction you have as a leader will have an impact. As a leader you need to live your culture every day. It needs to be more than just a poster on a wall or a well worded address at a staff meeting or assembly. As the leader you need to live it, breathe it, model it, inconsistencies in this area create doubt and uncertainty. It’s one thing to say you want a great culture; it’s another task altogether to strategically build and maintain it.

All Things to All People

It’s long been said that it takes a village to raise a child. Whilst our schools can been seen as a small village within a larger community I’m a firm believer that the village is much more representative of the community as a whole.

In today’s society raising children is much more complicated that it has ever been, there are societal expectations, economic pressures, complex family arrangements and the monster that is social media. These influences have created a complicated, multifaceted environment in which to raise well-rounded children. As governments and communities grapple with this increased complexity often seeking quick win solutions, it is increasingly becoming the role of our educational systems to become all things to all people.

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It’s time for the village to assume the collective responsibility.

Traditionally it has been the responsibility of families and their support networks to set expectations, model values and establish limits that define and shape a young person’s moral compass. Children can became products of their environment where they learn how to behave, how to express opinions, how to interact with those around them respectfully and how to navigate the world safely and productively. I agree that schools certainly have a key role to play in character development. Public education offers our students exposure to the full breadth of our community where they are able to access wide ranging views, beliefs and opinions. This is a strength of our system. Over recent years though, there has been a dramatic shift where schools and teachers are being tasked with the responsibility of tackling an increasingly wide range of social issues.

Whilst education is the great equaliser and assists in rising above poverty, racism, sexism and promotes the establishment of strong moral and ethical codes it is not the miracle solution to solving all societal issues. It appears that with each emerging issue, policy makers with all best intentions and boundless enthusiasm, rely solely on schools to provide education campaigns that address and target the platform of the day. Strong, well-meaning interest groups are crowding the curriculum in the hope that schools can right the wrongs of others. It seems that the default position to almost any problem in society is to teach it in schools. There seems to be a giant leap in the logic. If we cover issues related to road safety, water safety, responsible pet ownership, sun safety, civics, obesity, cyber safety, financial literacy and the list goes on then we will be able to adequately solve some of society’s greatest problems. Whilst these issues are all important they enter an already overcrowded curriculum. Adding to the curriculum may not necessarily be the best way to address such a broad range of social issues. If we continue to use schools as the sole vehicle for addressing social problems then we will always continue to miss the mark.

Schools will always respond to the social, emotional and welfare needs of their students as the role normally performed by families becomes more and more part of the daily school routine. The skill set of the modern day teacher has far outgrown the traditional model as they become counsellors, peace makers, social workers, law enforcers, nurses and careers advisors. Teachers continue to work daily on developing well rounded citizens who will and can contribute to society. But this is not their sole responsibility. It takes a village.

Why is it then that this has become the default? Partly because it is seen as an easy fix. There is an economic argument that says that it is more fiscally responsible to educate than to build infrastructure and support systems to address the cause of the problem. Long term solutions require changes in behaviour. Changes in behaviour come from education. Whilst there is undoubtedly an economic cost for delivering new educational programs it is certainly seen as a more cost effective method. The second reason is that education is the great equaliser. If we deliver relevant curriculum that educates on a particular issue then we are building a foundation of change from the ground up. Sowing the seeds of change and monitoring growth is a well-used strategy. However as educators we know that working on things in isolation is not always the most effective change management solution. We need all elements of the community to wrap around the issues to see real change.

As we look towards our schools of the future we face the challenge of assessing what we want our teachers to teach. If we are to continue to be front line educators of social change then we need to consider how this is done and at what expense? As our education systems increase in size it can be complex to allow the flexibility to address social issues as a whole of system response. Our task is to enable schools to work contextually with local issues in the confines of a large organisation. How do we alleviate system pressure to allow schools to focus on the relevant task at hand?  Whilst we can be quick to add to the ever growing list we can at times be slow to reduce it. I have noticed recently a focus on ‘decluttering’. Whilst this at present appears to be more on an administrative basis there is hope that it could move to a broader platform.

The biggest question though is what role will the village play in developing our schools of the future? How will all arms of the community work in partnership to develop the skills needed by our students to address the pressures of modern society? Education systems cannot continue to be all things to all people. As educators we know that it takes a village. It’s time for the village to assume the collective responsibility.

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